Endô Shûsaku reads Frantz Fanon: Deimperialization Meets Decolonization

Conférence de Christopher L. HILL, Professeur à l’Université de Michigan, donnera une conférence dans le cadre du séminaire collectif du Centre Japon le 17 mai 2018.

The Japanese novelist Endô Shûsaku and the Martiniquan anticolonial theorist and activist Frantz Fanon each studied in Lyon in the early 1950s. Endô’s stories and essays from the time show that he was reading the then-obscure Fanon closely. While it is unclear how Endô encountered Fanon, the use he made of Fanon’s work shows them examining the collapse of empires from asymmetrical positions, with Fanon writing about the struggle against European colonialism and Endô about the de-imperialization of Japan by countries struggling to maintain control of their own imperium. The encounter between Endô and Fanon illustrates not only unexamined connections in the history of imperialism but also the possibility of creating new transnational histories that deepen our understanding of a heterogeneous, polycentric world.

Jeudi 17 mai, de 11h à 13h
EHESS, Salle 11, 105 boulevard Raspail 75006 Paris

Résumé

Glossary / Bibliography

Yasuko D'Hulst

Ingénieure d'études, documentaliste

More Posts - Website

Empires on the Waterfront: Japan’s Ports and Power, 1858-1899

Catherine L. Phipps, Professeur à l’Université de Memphis, professeur invitée à l’EHESS au mois de mai 2018, donnera une conférence dans le cadre du séminaire de F. Gipouloux (CECMC-CCJ) et A. Kobiljski (CRJ-CCJ) « Aux origines de la mondialisation et de la divergence Europe-Asie », le 9 mai 2018.

Catherine L. Phipps est l’auteur d’un livre du même titre, publié en 2015 par Harvard University Press.

This talk examines a largely unacknowledged system of “special trading ports” that operated under full Japanese jurisdiction in the shadow of the better-known treaty ports and unequal treaties. In so doing, it recasts the rise of Japan’s empire as a process deeply embedded in the complicated system of maritime relations in East Asia during the pivotal second half of the nineteenth century.

The opening of Japan from the time of Matthew Perry’s visit and the revision of the unequal treaties look very different with the inclusion of special trading ports. Instead of five working international ports in 1899, Japan had 27 at home plus more in its new colony of Taiwan. Many of these ports were modernized and equipped to properly handle large ships and international trade. Further, they had customs houses, merchants who knew how to conduct foreign trade, and Moji, in particular, played a prominent role in the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95. The Japanese port city of Moji provides a new spatial framework for understanding Japan’s extended transition into the modern world of nation-states and helps to explain the rapidity of Japan’s industrialization and expansion.

Mercredi 9 mai 2018 de 11h à 13h
Salle A07-51, 54 boulevard Raspail, 75006 Paris

Yasuko D'Hulst

Ingénieure d'études, documentaliste

More Posts - Website

Art, artisanat ou industrie ? Transmissions et créations dans l’apprentissage de la céramique contemporaine au Japon

Cliché : A. Doublier
Alice Doublier, ATER à l’EHESS, jeune chercheuse associée au CRJ, interviendra à propos de « Art, artisanat ou industrie ? Transmissions et créations dans l’apprentissage de la céramique contemporaine au Japon » dans le cadre du séminaire « Actualités et nouvelles approches en histoire des techniques en Asie Orientale » animé par Aleksandra Kobiljski, (CCJ-CRJ) et Delphine Spicq,  (CCJ-CECMC/Collège de France).

Attention, changement de lieu :
Vendredi 4 mai, de 13 h à 16 h
EHESS, salle A07_46, 54 Bd Raspail 

 

Yasuko D'Hulst

Ingénieure d'études, documentaliste

More Posts - Website