Empires on the Waterfront: Japan’s Ports and Power, 1858-1899

Catherine L. Phipps, Professeur à l’Université de Memphis, professeur invitée à l’EHESS au mois de mai 2018, donnera une conférence dans le cadre du séminaire de F. Gipouloux (CECMC-CCJ) et A. Kobiljski (CRJ-CCJ) « Aux origines de la mondialisation et de la divergence Europe-Asie », le 9 mai 2018.

Catherine L. Phipps est l’auteur d’un livre du même titre, publié en 2015 par Harvard University Press.

This talk examines a largely unacknowledged system of “special trading ports” that operated under full Japanese jurisdiction in the shadow of the better-known treaty ports and unequal treaties. In so doing, it recasts the rise of Japan’s empire as a process deeply embedded in the complicated system of maritime relations in East Asia during the pivotal second half of the nineteenth century.

The opening of Japan from the time of Matthew Perry’s visit and the revision of the unequal treaties look very different with the inclusion of special trading ports. Instead of five working international ports in 1899, Japan had 27 at home plus more in its new colony of Taiwan. Many of these ports were modernized and equipped to properly handle large ships and international trade. Further, they had customs houses, merchants who knew how to conduct foreign trade, and Moji, in particular, played a prominent role in the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95. The Japanese port city of Moji provides a new spatial framework for understanding Japan’s extended transition into the modern world of nation-states and helps to explain the rapidity of Japan’s industrialization and expansion.

Mercredi 9 mai 2018 de 11h à 13h
Salle A07-51, 54 boulevard Raspail, 75006 Paris

Yasuko D'Hulst

Ingénieure d'études, documentaliste

More Posts - Website