Map Translation as Source and Process: from Print to Manuscript : nouvel article de Vera Dorofeeva-Lichtmann

Article de Vera Dorofeeva-Lichtmann (CRJ-CCJ) dans la revue Research Methods Primary Sources. (Marlborough: Adam Matthew Digital, 2021. 24 pages. DOI: 10.47594/RMPS_0102)

Dans cette article, elle discute également les cartes du Japon.

Lire l’article : https://pure.mpg.de/rest/items/item_3396662/component/file_3396663/content

A map, as a rule, combines graphic and textual elements—a geometric framework and cartographic symbols imposed by the system of cartographic representation applied in the map are intertwined with toponyms, glosses of legends, a title with explanatory notes, and other
textual interpolations that may be incorporated into the map’s body. Using a map as a source for studying the history of cartography, as well as in historical research, requires comprehending not only the language of its textual elements, but first and foremost its cartometric properties and cartographic conventions. The latter may be radically different from those worked out within the system of cartographic representation developed in modern Western cartography that is common to the contemporary educated audience worldwide. The importance of cartographic
language tends to be overlooked by historians, who often regard geographic maps as pictures and compendia of cultural data. Systems of cartographic representation may differ between cultural traditions, as well as within the same cultural tradition, and evolve alongside historical change and the development of geographical knowledge. Interactions between cultural traditions with different systems of cartographic representation generate hybrid maps characterized by a fusion of cartographic conventions. One manifestation of this interaction is translated maps, the maps by Julius Klaproth (1783–1835) providing just such an example. Maps to a considerable extent are shaped by the historical context of the time and place of their creation. In turn, due to specific information they embody, including rich and diverse cultural data, maps may bring new perspectives into historical research.

Yasuko D'Hulst

Ingénieure d'études, Chargée de valorisation scientifique

More Posts - Website


Yasuko D'Hulst

Ingénieure d'études, Chargée de valorisation scientifique

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search